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Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:29 AM | CCSVI Alliance Volg link
Let's go back and review fluid flow in the central nervous system:
Dr Juurlink's presentation "Blood Flow and Multiple Sclerosis". 2013
Blood Flow and Multiple Sclerosis
Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:57 AM | Venöse Multiple Sklerose, CVI & SVI, CCSVI Volg link
So You've Just Been Told You're Anemic? - No, you are most likely NOT! And when you (after watching the video) understand how the body's Iron Homeostasis works you will run away when an allopathic doctor tries to get you on all those highly toxic Iron supplements! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRy1MKKXWzg&t=9s
So You've Just Been Told You're Anemic?
What they tell you about Anemia is wrong. Here's why... Learn more about The Root Cause Protocol at http://gotmag.org/the-root-cause-protocol/
Friday, January 18, 2019 8:34 PM | CCSVI Alliance Volg link
More research on the gut microbiome and the MS patient..
https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/how-gut-immune-cells-can-fight-multiple-sclerosis?fbclid=IwAR3p3obJjWVgN_glQTM7a1a-gYcqMTnCPn4NZb1oI-dL9zuxlXL0WdlVr0g
How gut immune cells can fight multiple sclerosis
Scientists are learning how our guts connect to our brains.
Friday, January 18, 2019 7:52 PM | The Vascular Connection to Multiple Sclerosis Volg link
A new gut-brain link uncovered: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) cells are created in the lining of the gut by blood cells. They then travel to the brain, reducing inflammation. People w/MS appear to have lower levels of these cells in their feces. MS researchers will be studying ways to increase these powerful anti-inflammatory IgA cells, but here are some already studied and published means to increase your own IgA levels today:
1. Increase foods with Vitamin A- (carrots, spinach, liver, cod liver oil)
2. Zinc- (can be raised w/supplementation--as well as seafood, poultry, cashews)
3. Vitamin E- (dark leafy greens, eggs, nuts, avocado, sweet potato)
4. Lycopene (red and pink fruits and veggies like tomatoes, pink grapefruit, watermelon)
5. Try a gluten free diet. Gluten can bind to IgA cells, and limit their ability to travel to the brain.

Eat real food, mostly colorful fruits and veggies. Stay away from processed/man made foods, transfats, high sugar foods--which all increase inflammatory cells. The gut-brain connection is real, and we are what we eat.
How gut immune cells can fight multiple sclerosis
Scientists are learning how our guts connect to our brains.
Thursday, January 17, 2019 10:59 PM | CCSVI Alliance Volg link
Damage to the cerebellum in the MS brain is known to affect coordination, movement, speech and cognitive thinking. It will be interesting to see how new research on the cerebellum will link to the MS brain.
"A study in rodents found that the brain's cerebellum -- known to play a role in motor coordination -- also helps control the brain's reward circuitry. Researchers found a direct neural connection from the cerebellum to the ventral tegmental area (a brain area long known to be involved in reward processing and encoding). The findings shed light on the brain circuits critical to the affective and social dysfunction seen across multiple psychiatric disorders."
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/01/190117142151.htm
New findings reveal surprising role of the cerebellum in reward and social behaviors
A study in rodents found that the brain's cerebellum -- known to play a role in motor coordination -- also helps control the brain's reward circuitry. Researchers found a direct neural connection from the cerebellum to the ventral tegmental area (a brain area long known to be involved in reward proc...
Thursday, January 17, 2019 5:55 PM | Venöse Multiple Sklerose, CVI & SVI, CCSVI Volg link
Prof Zamboni via Twitter: “Now is definitely proven. #CCSVI provokes Demyelination and Hypoperfusion sharing symptoms with #MultipleSclerosis and #meniere becoming a necessary piece of a complex medical puzzle”

Clinical Characteristics and Neuroimaging Findings in Internal Jugular Venous Outflow Disturbance. Thromb Haemost. 2019

Abstract
Recently, internal jugular vein stenosis (IJVS) is gaining increasing attention from clinical researchers due to a series of confounding symptoms that impair the quality of life in affected individuals but cannot be explained by other well-established causes. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the clinical features, neuroimaging characteristics and pathogenesis of IJVS, and explore their possible correlations, in attempt to provide useful clues for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Forty-three eligible patients with unilateral or bilateral IJVS confirmed by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography of the brain and neck were enrolled in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging along with magnetic resonance angiography or computed tomography angiography was applied to identify the radiological pattern of parenchymal or arterial lesions. Cerebral perfusion and metabolism were evaluated by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Of the 43 patients (46.0 ± 16.0 years old; 30 female), 14 (32.6%) had bilateral and 29 had unilateral IJVS. The common clinical symptoms at admission were tinnitus (60.5%), tinnitus cerebri (67.6%), headache (48.8%), dizziness (32.6%), visual disorders (39.5%), hearing impairment (39.5%), neck discomfort (39.5%), sleep disturbance (60.5%), anxiety or depression (37.5%) and subjective memory decline (30.2%). The presence of bilateral demyelination changes with cloudy-like appearance in the periventricular area and/or centrum semiovale was found in 95.3% (41/43) patients. SPECT findings showed that 92.3% (24/26) patients displayed cerebral perfusion and metabolism mismatch, depicted by bilaterally and symmetrically reduced cerebral perfusion and increased cerebral glucose consumption. IJVS may contribute to alterations in cerebral blood flow and metabolism, as well as white matter lesion formation, all of which may account for its clinical manifestations.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30605919
Venöse Multiple Sklerose, CVI & SVI, CCSVI
Thursday, January 17, 2019 3:11 AM | DIRECT-MS shared a link. Volg link

Stem Cell Transplantation to Treat Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that results from breakdown of immunological tolerance toward the central nervous system. The early course of M
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 3:20 PM | CCSVI Alliance Volg link
Dr Fran’s Schelling’s new book is now available:
https://www.morebooks.de/store/gb/book/multiple-sclerosis-ccsvi-missed-key-evidence/isbn/978-613-9-92056-3
Multiple Sclerosis & CCSVI Missed key evidence
Multiple Sclerosis & CCSVI Missed key evidence, 978-613-9-92056-3, By correctly diagnosing a disease, perceiving its nature, gaining insight into its cause, any uncertainty is ended. The diagnosis clears the way to its cure or an alleviating of its effects. No diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, MS, ev...
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 8:00 PM | The Vascular Connection to Multiple Sclerosis Volg link
Lower arterial cerebral blood flow shown to be related to decline in cognitive abilities in MS patients vs. no relationship in healthy controls in latest study from Dr. Robert Zivadinov’s team.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1352458518819608
Lower total cerebral arterial flow contributes to cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis patients
Background: The cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients declines with aging, longer disease duration, and possibly cardiovascular comorbiditie...
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